Lead-Based Paint and Lead-Contaminated Dust

Lead-contaminated dust is the most common source of lead exposure.

Lead-contaminated dust is created when lead-based paint in older homes chips, flakes and peels.

Lead-contaminated dust is created when lead-based paint in older homes chips, flakes and peels
Lead-contaminated dust is created when lead-based paint in older homes chips, flakes and peels

This dust can get on hands, toys, cloth, fabric and more around the house. Breathing in or swallowing lead-contaminated dust can cause many health problems.

Homes built before 1978 are more likely to have lead-based paint.

Lead was often added to paint used in homes built before 1978. In 1978, the federal government banned the use of lead-based paint in homes. The older the home, the more likely it is to have lead-based paint.

The most common places to find lead-contaminated dust from paint in older homes are:

  • Windows
  • Doors
  • Exterior paint
  • Places where remodeling or repair is occurring
  • Where lead-painted surfaces scrape or rub together

The best way to prevent lead exposure in older homes is to stop the lead at the source. Hire a certified lead professional to help identify and remove lead from your home.

Resources

U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY INFORMATION LEAD REMEDIATION

A comprehensive resource for homeowners who would like to start the process of making their homes lead safe.
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MI LEAD SAFE - LEAD-BASED PAINT AND DUST

A comprehensive resource for homeowners who would like to start the process of making their homes lead safe.
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Comprehensive State of Michigan resource regarding the problem of lead-based paint hazards in older homes.
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